Fork2fit: Chef-Prepared Meals at Affordable Prices Available at Natur-Tyme Every Day

fork to fit (2 black)

By Shannon Morehouse, MA, CHHC
Certified Nutrition Counselor and Natur-Tyme’s Marketing Coordinator

People may think that an epicurean and a health food enthusiast are at opposite ends of the spectrum, but I consider myself both. An epicurean is said to have luxurious tastes in eating and drinking, while a health food enthusiast is often stereotyped as a crunchy-granola hippie type. I create gourmet healthy meals by sourcing my ingredients from my garden and farmer’s markets and then carefully preparing scrumptious meals. Sadly though, with a toddler in tow, I often do not have the time!

I’m happy to report that I can get the high-quality, delicious, locally-sourced healthy food I desire in prepared meal containers right here at Natur-Tyme every day without hurting my pocketbook! We now carry Fork2fit! Fork2fit meals are chef-prepared right here in CNY; they are fresh, high-quality, bursting with flavor, healthy, and energizing.

Their meal choices rotate twice a week. Some customer favorites include: Southwest Turkey Stir-Fry, Meatloaf with Cauliflower Mash, and Chicken Fajitas. Natur-Tyme sells some organic options as well and we are the exclusive providers of vegan and vegetarian Fork2fit meal options such as the Vegetarian Mushroom Caprese and the Vegan Winter Squash Risotto that customers rave about. I have loved every Fork2fit meal I’ve tried and I bet you will too!

The best part of all is that these meals are affordable; they range from $6.99 to $11.49 a meal. Come pick up a meal; it’s like having a personal chef! Learn more about Fork2fit on our website.

Be-witching Maca Chocolate Fondue with Apple Bats

0785 Vega Halloween Recipe Book.inddSubmitted by Vega

1 un-poisoned, washed, unpeeled apple
Lemon juice
Souls of 10 Maca Chocolate bars, dispatched into tiny bits
1 pumpkin, gruesomely gutted (for serving)

1 Take 1 washed, unpeeled apple and cut it into thin, flat slices leaving the core intact. (Slices should be about a 1⁄4“ thick).

2 Take one of the hexed slices and cut it in half (removing the
core bits) and start shaping your apples into bats (or ghosts, or tombstones, or spiders, as strikes your fancy) with a knife. If you have a small sharp metal cookie cutter in your shape of choice, better yet.

3 Pour a small amount of lemon juice onto the hexed apple shapes to keep them from turning brown.

4 Melt 10 Maca Chocolate bars in either a double boiler or in the microwave.

5 Hollow out pumpkin and place fondue bowl base and fondue bowl inside the pumpkin bowl. Carefully spoon the chocolate into the fondue bowl and enjoy quickly before the
chocolate thickens or the zombies get you.

Hauntingly Delicious Spellcakes

0785 Vega Halloween Recipe Book.indd

Submitted by Vega

VEGAN & GLUTEN FREE

SERVES 12

1 c of enchanted almond milk
1 tsp evil apple cider vinegar
3/4 c granulated sugar
1/3 c of light olive or melted coconut oil
2 tsp vampire vanilla extract
1/2 c gluten-free flour (such as Bob’s Red Mill All Purpose Baking Flour)
1 scoop or single-serving pack of Vega Sport Performance Protein (37g)
1/3 c cackling cocoa powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp magic baking powder 1/4 tsp salt

1 Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a muffin pan with paper liners.

2 Whisk together the almond milk and vinegar in a large bowl, and set aside for a few minutes to cackle and curdle.

3 Add the sugar, oil, and vanilla extract to the almond milk mixture
and beat until foamy. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Add in two batches to wet ingredients and bludgeon them until no large lumps remain (a few tiny lumps are okay). Pour into liners, filling 3/4 of the way.

4 Bake for 20 minutes, until a pitch fork inserted into the center comes out clean. Transfer to a cooling rack and let cool completely.

5 Top with any vegan butter cream icing and die a hundred times from wicked deliciousness!

Italian Spaghetti Squash

By Laurel Sterling, MA, RD, CDN

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The first time my mother cooked this for me, I was in love! Can you believe I had been deprived of experiencing the many wonders of spaghetti squash until I was 43? My mom made this for me last year and I could not get enough of it. As a vegetarian, I sometimes would eat this as my main dish, or as a side to my dinner, or even topped with eggs in the morning. It is a very versatile dish and simple to make.

Italian Spaghetti Squash

1 (4-pound) spaghetti squash

1 c. finely chopped onion

1 c. chopped zucchini

1 c. chopped yellow squash

1 c. chopped green pepper

1 (25-ounce) jar of tomato-basil sauce

1 TBSP chopped fresh oregano (Or you can use Italian seasoning)

1 TBSP chopped fresh basil (Or Italian seasoning)

1 tsp freshly ground pepper

Prep and bake the squash:

Wash squash; cut in half lengthwise. Remove and discard seeds or keep to plant. Place squash halves, cut sides down, in a 13x9x2″ baking dish coated with cooking spray. Add water to dish to depth of 1/2″. Bake at 375 degrees for 40 minutes or until squash is tender. Let cool slightly. Using a fork, remove spaghetti-like strands; compost shells. Set strands aside and keep warm.

Sauté vegetables on medium heat with olive oil, macadamia nut oil, or coconut oil. Add sauce and seasonings, and then mix spaghetti squash strands into the mixture. Enjoy!!

Gluten-Free, Vegan Apple Crisp Recipe

By Laurel Sterling, MA, RD176822647

I am a big fan of just about any type of cooked apple dessert. This is a great recipe to add to a weeknight meal because of the ease of prep time involved. You also do not need to have much experience in the kitchen to make this. So go ahead and enjoy! My favorite variety of apple to use here is Granny Smith though the Ginger Gold variety works great too!

Filling:
3 to 4 baking apples, peeled, cored, and sliced thin (⅛-inch thick)
2 to 4 tablespoons honey, maple syrup, or agave nectar
1 tablespoon arrowroot powder
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 teaspoons cinnamon

Topping:
1 ½ cups rolled gluten-free oats
½ cup sweet rice flour
½ to ¾ cup coconut sugar*
1 teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon sea salt
½ cup melted virgin coconut oil (or butter)*
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Place all ingredients for the filling into a 7 x 11-inch baking pan. Gently stir together with a large spoon. A good gauge for sufficient fruit is to fill your pan almost to the top with sliced fruit. It will cook down quite a bit. See the photo below.

In a small mixing bowl stir together the oats, rice flour, sugar, cinnamon, and sea salt. Add oil and vanilla and stir together with a fork. Using your hands, crumble the topping evenly over the filling.

Bake for about 40 minutes or until the juices are bubbling up and the topping is lightly browned.

*Notes: Use organic brown sugar, Sucanat, or maple sugar in the topping instead of coconut sugar if desired. Sometimes I add 1 to 2 tablespoonsmore oil to the topping if the mixture seems to need it.

Lemon Juice can be omitted if you are sensitive to citrus.

Italian Plum Variation: Use 4 to 5 cups pitted, halved plums in place of the apples or a combination of the two. Toss with 3 to 4 tablespoons arrowroot; increase liquid sweetener to 4 tablespoons; omit lemon juice.

Source: www.nourishingmeals.com

Vegetarianism: Part 4 of 5

By Laurel Sterling Prisco MA, RD, CDN

Vegans, similar to vegetarians, do not consume meat, fish, or poultry. In addition to that, they do not use other animal products and by-products such as eggs, dairy products, gelatin, and honey. Their diets are free of cholesterol, and are low in saturated fat due to the animal products they avoid. High-monounsaturated fat foods in their diet include: oils (olive, macadamia nut), nuts (almonds, walnuts, pecans, and cashews), nut butters, seed butters (sesame, sunflower), avocado, and extra virgin coconut.

Vegans should make sure to include good sources of alpha-linolenic acid in their diets such as flaxseed, flaxseed oil, tofu, fermented soy, and walnuts in order to maximize their production of EPA and DHA (omega-3 fatty acids).

Protein sources for a vegan include: lentils, chickpeas, tofu, tempeh, nut butters, nuts, brown rice, quinoa, and fermented soy/rice/hemp/chia protein shakes or bars. L-carnitine, which is most often found in meat sources, is commonly deficient in a vegan’s diet. L-carnitine is similar to an amino acid (also related to B vitamins). Taking an amino-acid supplement or eating grains, such as cornmeal, that have been fortified with lysine are important. To manufacture l-carnitine we need enough iron, B1, B6, vitamin C, l-lysine, and l-methionine.

Vitamin D3 is not found in the vegan diet. It can be made by sunlight exposure to the skin if you live somewhere other than Syracuse….just kidding! Vitamin D2 (a vegetarian/vegan food source) will not be converted into D3 (the most bioavailable form) if sunscreen is applied on the body. Approximately 15-30 minutes of summer sun without sunscreen on arms, legs, and face three times a week is recommended for vitamin D production. People should get their Serum 25(OH) D level taken in the winter months to see their level. Levels should optimally be between 40-60ng/ml. If it is low, then a vegan vitamin D supplement should be taken.

Calcium is found in dark green vegetables, tofu made with calcium sulfate, and calcium-fortified orange juice. Oxalic acid, which is found in spinach, rhubarb, chard, and beet greens, binds with calcium and reduces calcium absorption.

Vegans should consider adding a well-absorbed calcium/magnesium supplement to their regime taken with the vitamin D supplement.

Dried beans and dark green leafy vegetables are especially good sources of iron. Lentils, blackstrap molasses, kidney beans, chickpeas, black-eyed peas, Swiss chard, tempeh, black beans, prune juice, beet greens, tahini, peas, bulghur, bok choy, raisins, watermelon, millet, and kale have non-heme iron in them. Non-heme (plant source) forms of iron are not well absorbed; therefore, they should be consumed along with foods containing vitamin C in order to increase iron absorption.

A great non-animal source of B12 is nutritional yeast. Tempeh, miso, and seaweed (dulse, kelp, nori) contain B12, but the amount of vitamin B12 present depends on the type of processing the food undergoes. It is especially important for pregnant and lactating women, infants, and children to have reliable sources of vitamin B12 in their diets. Supplementation may be necessary; there is a vegan B12 supplement from Garden of Life.

There are various supplement companies that have vegetarian and/or vegan products such as New Chapter Organics, MegaFoods, and Garden of Life. Check them out!

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